Detect WebVR Support with JavaScript

By  on  

It's been two years since I was heavily involved with WebVR at Mozilla but, despite not contributing every day, I can see VR making leaps and bounds, from Firefox making an increased effort to Chrome pushing VR and Oculus and HTC (Vive) improving their offerings.  Native games are getting better but, more importantly, browsers are getting faster and three.js and aframe are empowering incredible VR experiences with JavaScript.

Before you can serve up VR experiences, however, you need to ensure the browser supports VR experiences.  To do so, you need to ensure navigator.getVRDisplays is available:

const supportsVR = 'getVRDisplays' in navigator;

if (supportsVR) {
    navigator.getVRDisplays().then(function(displays) {
      // ... Load VR experience
    });
}
else {
    // ... Show "you need {x} browser" message
}

If navigator.getVRDisplays is present, it's likely that the browser supports VR and AR experiences.

Virtual reality and augmented reality have the potential to change the world and enrich lives.  Learning how to code VR experiences will get you ahead of the curve, and as always, coding those experiences for the browser will break down the barrier of entry!

Recent Features

  • By
    CSS vs. JS Animation: Which is Faster?

    How is it possible that JavaScript-based animation has secretly always been as fast — or faster — than CSS transitions? And, how is it possible that Adobe and Google consistently release media-rich mobile sites that rival the performance of native apps? This article serves as a point-by-point...

  • By
    Serving Fonts from CDN

    For maximum performance, we all know we must put our assets on CDN (another domain).  Along with those assets are custom web fonts.  Unfortunately custom web fonts via CDN (or any cross-domain font request) don't work in Firefox or Internet Explorer (correctly so, by spec) though...

Incredible Demos

  • By
    CSS Kwicks

    One of the effects that made me excited about client side and JavaScript was the Kwicks effect.  Take a list of items and react to them accordingly when hovered.  Simple, sweet.  The effect was originally created with JavaScript but come five years later, our...

  • By
    MooTools 1.2 Image Protector: dwProtector

    Image protection is a hot topic on the net these days, and why shouldn't it be? If you spent two hours designing an awesome graphic, would you want it ripped of in matter of seconds? Hell no! That's why I've created an image...

Discussion

    Wrap your code in <pre class="{language}"></pre> tags, link to a GitHub gist, JSFiddle fiddle, or CodePen pen to embed!