Reset File Changes with git

By  on  

There are many different philosophies when it comes to code review but mine is fairly simple:  I like receiving early "work in progress" patches, I like to be positive in my code review messages, and if a patch is 90% there, I like to finish the patch myself so the project and contributor both benefit.

Every once in while, however, a patch comes in with an unrelated file change or code added to the wrong file, in which case I need to reset a file's contents before the change commit.  You can restore a file's contents before a patch with the following:

git reset origin/master path/to/file-to-be-changed.ext

Once this shell snippet is executed, the file's contents are restored and can be re-commited to restore the file contents.

Recent Features

  • By
    Responsive and Infinitely Scalable JS Animations

    Back in late 2012 it was not easy to find open source projects using requestAnimationFrame() - this is the hook that allows Javascript code to synchronize with a web browser's native paint loop. Animations using this method can run at 60 fps and deliver fantastic...

  • By
    How to Create a RetroPie on Raspberry Pi – Graphical Guide

    Today we get to play amazing games on our super powered game consoles, PCs, VR headsets, and even mobile devices.  While I enjoy playing new games these days, I do long for the retro gaming systems I had when I was a kid: the original Nintendo...

Incredible Demos

  • By
    HTML5 Input Types Alternative

    As you may know, HTML5 has introduced several new input types: number, date, color, range, etc. The question is: should you start using these controls or not? As much as I want to say "Yes", I think they are not yet ready for any real life...

  • By
    MooTools Documentation Search Favelet

    I'm going to share something with you that will blow your mind: I don't have the MooTools documentation memorized. I just don't. I visit the MooTools docs frequently to figure out the order of parameters of More classes and how best to use...

Discussion

  1. Wouldn’t

    git checkout path/to/file

    achieve the same?

Wrap your code in <pre class="{language}"></pre> tags, link to a GitHub gist, JSFiddle fiddle, or CodePen pen to embed!