JavaScript waitForever

By  on  

Writing mochitests for new features in DevTools can be difficult and time-consuming.  There are so many elements interacting in an async manner that I oftentimes find myself using the debugger to debug the debugger!  In the case where it's unclear what interaction isn't working properly, I find myself going to a neat utility function: waitForever.  By using this function, paired with await, I can interact with the page while a given test is running to find the problem!

The JavaScript

waitForever is a super small snippet:

function waitForever() {
  return new Promise(r => {});
}

// Usage:
await waitForever();

The function uses a promise which never resolves, thus no additional statements are triggered while also not locking up the browser.  From there I can click around and explore elements to find what I've messed up in my test.

Utility functions like these make web development much easier and more enjoyable.  Add this one to your toolbox!

Recent Features

  • By
    Being a Dev Dad

    I get asked loads of questions every day but I'm always surprised that they're rarely questions about code or even tech -- many of the questions I get are more about non-dev stuff like what my office is like, what software I use, and oftentimes...

  • By
    CSS vs. JS Animation: Which is Faster?

    How is it possible that JavaScript-based animation has secretly always been as fast — or faster — than CSS transitions? And, how is it possible that Adobe and Google consistently release media-rich mobile sites that rival the performance of native apps? This article serves as a point-by-point...

Incredible Demos

  • By
    MooTools Window Object Dumping

    Ever want to see all of the information stored within the window property of your browser? Here's your chance. The XHTML We need a wrapper DIV that we'll consider a console. The CSS I like making this look like a command-line console. The MooTools JavaScript Depending on what you have loaded...

  • By
    Dynamically Load Stylesheets Using MooTools 1.2

    Theming has become a big part of the Web 2.0 revolution. Luckily, so too has a higher regard for semantics and CSS standards. If you build your pages using good XHTML code, changing a CSS file can make your website look completely different.

Discussion

  1. Kenji Okamoto

    Thanks for the tip David! I’ll keep that in mind when working on mochi tests. Have you found any other uses for this snippet?

Wrap your code in <pre class="{language}"></pre> tags, link to a GitHub gist, JSFiddle fiddle, or CodePen pen to embed!