O'Reilly

Link Nudging Using Dojo

By on  
Dojo Toolkit

In the past we've tinkered with link nudging with MooTools and link nudging with jQuery. In an effort to familiarize myself with other JavaScript frameworks, we're going to try to duplicate that effect with another awesome framework: Dojo.

The JavaScript: Attempt 1

dojo.addOnLoad(function() {
	var links = dojo.query('a.nudge');
	//foreach...
	dojo.forEach(links,function(link) {
		var left = dojo.style(link,'paddingLeft');
		dojo.connect(link,'onmouseenter',function() {
			dojo.animateProperty({
				node:link,
				properties: {
					paddingLeft: (left + 10)
				}
			}).play();
		});
		dojo.connect(link,'onmouseleave',function() {
			dojo.animateProperty({
				node:link,
				properties: {
					paddingLeft: left
				}
			}).play();
		});
	});
});

Once the DOM is ready, we use the dojo.query method to find all of the links to nudge. For every link we find, we record its original left padding and add mouseenter and mouseleave events to each link to animate its left padding.

The JavaScript: Better Solution

dojo.ready(function() {
	dojo.query('a.nudge').forEach(function(link){
		var left = dojo.style(link,'paddingLeft');
		dojo.connect(link,'onmouseenter',function() {
		    dojo.anim(link, { paddingLeft:20 });
		});
		dojo.connect(link,'onmouseleave',function() {
		    dojo.anim(link, { paddingLeft:left });
		});
	});
});

Dojo lead Pete Higgins showed me a more condensed version of his script.

Simple, no? The best way to learn to use any JavaScript framework is to duplicate a given set of code you are familiar with, much like we did here. What do you think about this Dojo example? Look close to jQuery and MooTools?

O'Reilly Velocity Conference
Save 20% with discount code AFF20

Recent Features

  • Designing for Simplicity

    Before we get started, it's worth me spending a brief moment introducing myself to you. My name is Mark (or @integralist if Twitter happens to be your communication tool of choice) and I currently work for BBC News in London England as a principal engineer/tech...

  • Vibration API

    Many of the new APIs provided to us by browser vendors are more targeted toward the mobile user than the desktop user.  One of those simple APIs the Vibration API.  The Vibration API allows developers to direct the device, using JavaScript, to vibrate in...

Incredible Demos

  • Implement jQuery’s hover() Method in MooTools

    jQuery offers a quick event shortcut method called hover that accepts two functions that represent mouseover and mouseout actions. Here's how to implement that for MooTools Elements. The MooTools JavaScript We implement hover() which accepts to functions; one will be called on mouseenter and the other...

  • iPad Detection Using JavaScript or PHP

    The hottest device out there right now seems to be the iPad. iPad this, iPad that, iPod your mom. I'm underwhelmed with the device but that doesn't mean I shouldn't try to account for such devices on the websites I create. In Apple's...

Discussion

  1. The mouseenter/mouseleave thing is so common it is actually combined as an API in plugd (soon to be in Dojo proper). With plugd, the Dojo code could look like:

    $.ready(function() {
    	$('a.nudge').forEach(function(link){
    	    var $link = $(link), left = $link.style('paddingLeft');
    		$link.hover(function(e){
    		    $link.anim({ paddingLeft: /enter|over/.test(e.type) ? 20 : left})
    		})
    	});
    });
  2. Couldn’t agree more on what you said: “The best way to learn to use any javascript framework is to duplicate a given set of code you are familiar with”

    By the way, I think the Mootools code is more semantic than the rest, I mean, with jQuery one has to know that .hover is an event, unlike MooTools which says .addEvent.

    I liked Dojo’s aproch, but the .connect is new to me, but just by reading it I understood that it will connect link to the event and the function.

    Very nice example and keep up the good work.

  3. Jack Franklin

    Hi Rafael / David

    @Rafael F P Viana: You can use jQuery’s bind method which is the same as MooTool’s addEvent essentially.

    Good post David, I actually really like Dojo’s layout so I might investigate. However, it’s clear that MT/jQ are the top two so I think I’m concentrating my skill on those two.

  4. Brad Pritchard

    Nice one. One note/question – if your anchors needed a default padding-left of 15px, then the effect would be muted a bit. Rather than setting padding-left to a static 20, what about changing line 5 to a relative 20?


    dojo.anim(link, { paddingLeft: (left + 20) });

  5. @Brad Pritchard: Much better — I’ll update the post!

  6. Sid Burn

    Do you just limiting to Dojo Base? In Dojo Core there is dojo.behavior that has some additional functionality.
    http://www.dojotoolkit.org/api/dojo/behavior.html

    With dojo.behavior you can write your code like this:

    dojo.require("dojo.behavior");
    dojo.ready(function(){
      dojo.behavior.add({
        'a.nude': {
          'onmouseenter': function(evt) { 
            dojo.anim(evt.target, { paddingLeft:20 }); 
          },
          'onmouseleave': function(evt) {
            dojo.anim(evt.target, { paddingLeft:left });
          }
        }
      });
      dojo.behavior.apply();
    });
    

    The good part on dojo.behavior is that you can call dojo.behavior.apply() as often as you like. It only updates your DOM incremental. Meaning it only adds the events to newly created DOM nodes, or only add things to a node that you added after the last call to dojo.behavior.apply().

    That means you can do some ajax add nodes to your DOM, and call dojo.behavior.apply() after it. And the new nodes get your defined behavior.

  7. @Sid Burn: Thanks for the tip Sid. By the way, I’ve never given a link the “nude” tag before. :)

  8. Sid Burn

    Ah “nude” oder “nudge” for a non-native english speaker it is almost the same. ;)

Wrap your code in <pre class="{language}"></pre> tags, link to a GitHub gist, JSFiddle fiddle, or CodePen pen to embed!

Recently on David Walsh Blog

  • Prevent Chrome from Translating a Page

    A while back I shared my favorite Google Chrome extension:  Google Art Project.  I've enjoyed seeing beautiful art when I open a new tab -- it's brought genuine happiness to my day, however small that happiness may be.  About a week ago, however, the art presented had...

  • Create Any Type Of Website With These Multi-Purpose Themes

    We have selected what we believe are the very best multipurpose WordPress themes on the market today. Our list contains a number of best sellers, several newcomers that are proving to be highly popular, and a few themes that are ideal for creating the types of...

  • An Introduction to Static Site Generators

    Static site generators seem to have been becoming more and more popular recently, but they’re not one of those ephemeral novelty things that grow in popularity as quickly as they fall into oblivion shortly after. For over a decade, many different projects — 394 of...

  • Automated Tests for Visual Responsive Layouts

    Today it's all about testing. In 2015, many developers knows about TDD and I personally think that testing is one of the key for quality products. But what about testing in a Front-end environment? How do you guys write your tests for a responsive page or...

  • Getting Dicey With Flexbox

    What if you could build complex CSS layouts in minutes? Flexbox is a new CSS layout spec that makes it easy to construct dynamic layouts. With flexbox, vertical centering, same-height columns, reordering, and direction agnosticism are a piece of cake. There's a popular myth floating around that...