then on Objects

By  on  

Promises were a revelation in JavaScript development, allowing us to enjoy async processing and avoid callback hell. Many new APIs like Battery API, Cache API, and others use the promise API. One fact you may not know is that you can add a then method to any object to make it Promise-like!

Let's create a generic object with a then method that accepts a resolve function as its argument:

j = { then: resolve => fetch("/").then(resolve) }

With an object featuring a then method, you can call the then method or use await syntax:

j.then(res => console.log(res));
// Response {type: "basic", url: "https://davidwalsh.name/", redirected: false, status: 200, ok: true, …}

// ... or an await...
const response = await j;
// Response {type: "basic", url: "https://davidwalsh.name/", redirected: false, status: 200, ok: true, …}

This technique is interesting and, under the right circumstances, can be employed to represent a logical usage.

Hack or useful? How would you use this perk of then?

Recent Features

  • By
    Send Text Messages with PHP

    Kids these days, I tell ya.  All they care about is the technology.  The video games.  The bottled water.  Oh, and the texting, always the texting.  Back in my day, all we had was...OK, I had all of these things too.  But I still don't get...

  • By
    Responsive Images: The Ultimate Guide

    Chances are that any Web designers using our Ghostlab browser testing app, which allows seamless testing across all devices simultaneously, will have worked with responsive design in some shape or form. And as today's websites and devices become ever more varied, a plethora of responsive images...

Incredible Demos

  • By
    Scroll IFRAMEs on iOS

    For the longest time, developers were frustrated by elements with overflow not being scrollable within the page of iOS Safari.  For my blog it was particularly frustrating because I display my demos in sandboxed IFRAMEs on top of the article itself, so as to not affect my site's...

  • By
    Introducing MooTools NextPrev

    One thing I love doing is duplicating OS functionalities. One of the things your OS allows you to do easily is move from one item to another. Most of the time you're simply trying to get to the next or the previous item.

Discussion

  1. Edgar

    Nice, although fetch may be a bad example since you would definitely want to deal with errors. But for promises of which you are sure they always resolve, it’s cool.

Wrap your code in <pre class="{language}"></pre> tags, link to a GitHub gist, JSFiddle fiddle, or CodePen pen to embed!