Submit Button Enabling

By  on  

"Enabling" you ask? Yes. We all know how to disable the submit upon form submission and the reasons for doing so, but what about re-enabling the submit button after an allotted amount of time. After all, what if the user presses the "stop" button immediately after submitting the form? They'd be screwed. Why not re-enable the submit button after an allotted amount of time so that the user may re-submit?

The MooTools JavaScript

window.addEvent('domready',function() {
		var subber = $('submit');
		subber.addEvent('click',function() {
			subber.set('value','Submitting...').disabled = true;
			(function() { subber.disabled = false; subber.set('value','Resubmit'); }).delay(10000); // how much time?  10 seconds
		});
	});

Of course, this isn't ideal in all situations. It is, however, a nice touch if your system can accommodate for it.

Update: Upon submission, the button's message changes to "submitting..." and once enabled, the message changes to "Resubmit." Thank you to Facundo Corradini for the suggestion!

Recent Features

  • By
    Vibration API

    Many of the new APIs provided to us by browser vendors are more targeted toward the mobile user than the desktop user.  One of those simple APIs the Vibration API.  The Vibration API allows developers to direct the device, using JavaScript, to vibrate in...

  • By
    I’m an Impostor

    This is the hardest thing I've ever had to write, much less admit to myself.  I've written resignation letters from jobs I've loved, I've ended relationships, I've failed at a host of tasks, and let myself down in my life.  All of those feelings were very...

Incredible Demos

  • By
    HTML5 Datalist

    One of the most used JavaScript widgets over the past decade has been the text box autocomplete widget.  Every JavaScript framework has their own autocomplete widget and many of them have become quite advanced.  Much like the placeholder attribute's introduction to markup, a frequently used...

  • By
    Pure CSS Slide Up and Slide Down

    If I can avoid using JavaScript for element animations, I'm incredibly happy and driven to do so.  They're more efficient, don't require a JavaScript framework to manage steps, and they're more elegant.  One effect that is difficult to nail down with pure CSS is sliding up...