parseInt and Radix

By  on  

Everyone knows that the parseInt function within JavaScript turns your decimal number or string into a rounded integer.  parseInt turns 10.937 into 10, 0.2 into 0, and "someValue" into NaN.  If you use parseInt without a radix, however, you'll receive a warning that no radix has been provided.  In most cases, the radix you want to use is 10:

parseInt(10.83, 10); // 10, no warning
parseInt(.83, 10); // 0, no warning

parseInt(0.8); // 8, unintended result
parseInt(0.8, 10); // 0, intended result

Using a 10 radix means the number is parsed with a base 10 and thus turns the number into the integer you're expecting, without the annoying warning.  The radix is important if you're need to guarantee accuracy with variable input (basic number, binary, etc.).  For best results, always use a radix of 10!

Recent Features

Incredible Demos

  • By
    Create Your Own Dijit CSS Theme with LESS CSS

    The Dojo Toolkit seems to just get better and better.  One of the new additions in Dojo 1.6 was the use of LESS CSS to create Dijit themes.  The move to using LESS is a brilliant one because it makes creating your own Dijit theme...

  • By
    Build a Calendar Using PHP, XHTML, and CSS

    One of the website features my customers love to provider their web users is an online dynamic calendar. An online calendar can be used for events, upcoming product specials, memos, and anything else you can think of. I've taken some time to completely...

Discussion

  1. Nice!!!@

  2. whoever

    It’s especially important when you convert strings like ‘010’ for instance :).

  3. MaxArt

    It may be that I rarely use parseInt, but where’s this warning you’re talking about?
    I can’t see it in the console.

  4. xadet

    @MaxArt jshint and jslint display the warnings, not the console.

    • MaxArt

      Aahh, JSLint, ok.
      Maybe that’s because it’s an instrument of the Devil.

  5. “Everyone knows that the parseInt function within JavaScript turns your decimal number into a rounded integer”
    In reality parseInt turns your strings into rounded integers. I think decimals are cast to strings and then integers when calling this function. To turn decimals into integers there are Math.round / Math.ceil / Math.floor

    Also, parseInt(0.8) returns 0 in the latest Chrome and Firefox.

    All these quick beginners code tips you have been posting lately… is that because of lack of sleep / time due to fatherhood?

  6. parseInt will turn “someValue” to NaN, not 0

  7. Om Shankar

    Nice catch.
    However, I didn’t expect it on your site, as this is a very basic thing put in “Number” sections of many JS Primer Books

  8. A minor point: 10.937 to 10 is not rounding. Perhaps you meant “whole number” not “rounded number”?

  9. 新設する原案もまとめた プラダ 財布 公式。

  10. e cigarette… e cigarette, electronic cigarette review, best electronic cigarette e cig! e cig! electronic cigarette! e cigarettes ecig! e cigarette electronic cigarettes… electronic cigarette reviews? e cigarette electronic cigarette reviews best electronic cigarette. electronic cigarette reviews electronic cigarette… electronic cigarettes best electronic cigarette,

  11. Peter Ho

    I tried on IE10, firefox and chrome, I don’t see the problem. parseInt(“0.8”) returns 0.

  12. Peter : jsLint say “Missing radix parameter” if you don’t set it

  13. The radix is really annoying. If I know the string it an int (from the GUI, say), I just use parseFloat(str).

Wrap your code in <pre class="{language}"></pre> tags, link to a GitHub gist, JSFiddle fiddle, or CodePen pen to embed!