JavaScript Detect Async Function

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JavaScript async/await has changed the landscape of how we code. We're no longer stuck in callback or then hell, and our code can feel more "top down" again.

Async functions require the following syntax:

async function myFunction() {

}

To use await with a function, the function needs to be declared with async. That got me to thinking: is it possible to detect if a function is asynchronous?

To detect if a function is asynchronous, use the function's constructor.name property:

const isAsync = myFunction.constructor.name === "AsyncFunction";

If the value is AsyncFunction, you know the function is async!

Async functions are my preferred method of working with promises. Knowing if a function is async could be useful as a library creator or a typing/validation utility.

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Discussion

  1. Sam

    This seems like a bad idea to me. You shouldn’t ever need to know if a function is asynchronous, because it can be treated the same as a non-async function that returns a Promise, and all functions can be treated as if they return a Promise by enclosing the call in Promise.resolve(). I can’t think of a single circumstance when this would actually be a sensible way to achieve a goal.

  2. I would just like to point out, you should avoid trying to detect if a function is async or not. The reason is, there’s really no difference between these two functions, in terms of how they should be used:

    async function getPerson(id) { .. }
    
    function getRecord(id) {
       return getPerson(id)
          .then(function(person){ return { data: person }; });
    }
    

    In other words, both functions return a promise, and thus you should interact with both of them in the same way, receiving that promise and doing something appropriate with it, regardless of the “kind” of function that was called. The type of the return value is the important characteristic.

    Ostensibly, the only reason you need to check if a function is async or not is as a sort of identity check to figure out if you should expect a promise returned or not. But that is a brittle and unreliable sort of assumption, since getRecord(..) above would fail the check but still returns a promise.

    Try to write code so that it’s obvious and reliable, regardless of function kind, whether a promise or immediate value will be returned.

    • I guess I should have mentioned that I’m not advocating that this is the way to know if you’re receiving a promise or not — just looking to see if the function was declared as async.

  3. Jaime

    If you need to be “defensive” with the returned value of a function, you can also wrap the returned value with Promise.resolve() this way:

    Promise.resolve( unknownFunction(/* args needed */) ).then( value => {
       /* whatever you need to do with the value */
    } );
    

    and that only in the case of consuming transpiled code but your own code can’t use await. In the case of full native async/await environment, await value works even if the value is not a Promise, so there’s no need to know is function is async or not.

  4. Stev0

    Wow, slammed for offering a potential way to meta code async and await. Thanks for the nuggets David. Sure in a perfect world where you got the write the program from the ground up I agree this is not a needed step. But we don’t live in a perfect world. When you get a project full of callbacks and need to switch between async and callbacks, knowing if a method is async is a very necessary step in lieu of performing a potentially massive refactor.
    I suppose it just gets to me when coders give unsolicited advice without understanding context. Code isn’t written in a vacuum.

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