Submit Button Enabling

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"Enabling" you ask? Yes. We all know how to disable the submit upon form submission and the reasons for doing so, but what about re-enabling the submit button after an allotted amount of time. After all, what if the user presses the "stop" button immediately after submitting the form? They'd be screwed. Why not re-enable the submit button after an allotted amount of time so that the user may re-submit?

The MooTools JavaScript

window.addEvent('domready',function() {
		var subber = $('submit');
		subber.addEvent('click',function() {
			subber.set('value','Submitting...').disabled = true;
			(function() { subber.disabled = false; subber.set('value','Resubmit'); }).delay(10000); // how much time?  10 seconds
		});
	});

Of course, this isn't ideal in all situations. It is, however, a nice touch if your system can accommodate for it.

Update: Upon submission, the button's message changes to "submitting..." and once enabled, the message changes to "Resubmit." Thank you to Facundo Corradini for the suggestion!

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